Fingerprints of Independence

Unless you’ve been to Washington D.C. to see the Declaration of Independence with your own eyes, you might not know it has somebody’s fingerprint ink smudge on it. I know, insensitive right? How dare you—whoever you are—put your grubby fingers all over the most precious gift of liberty ever bestowed upon the civilized world.

I wouldn’t blame any proper American for responding this way, but with respect to the circumstances, we ought to cut the guy some slack. For one thing, the Declaration of Independence that is on display in the National Archives Building is one of several original drafts. It’s not as if he soiled the only copy extant. Secondly, chances are high that, as the Continental Congress was accustomed to doing, he had to pack up the Declaration in a hurry and flee from the threat of the British Army. And, of course, we can’t leave out the most important detail surrounding this whole discussion: Some guy literally left his fingerprint on THE Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson and John Hancock left metaphorical fingerprints on the document, but this guy actually impressed a part of himself, unique to him and him alone, permanently onto one of the most valuable documents in all of history.

Nothing illustrates the beauty of America’s Independence Day better than this. The fingerprints of unknown individuals helping to shape a nation are what America is supposed to be about. American liberty was not won by the efforts of a few famous founding fathers, but by the life-long commitments of billions of normal people. How many signers of the Declaration can you actually name? What about the Constitution? Can you list more than five vice presidents or Supreme Court justices? The goal is not to shame you because you are not a history scholar; I want to encourage you because you are a history maker. No one is arguing against the influence of any revolutionary framers or anyone who has served in public office, yet when even their names go unremembered, why do we continue to ignorantly attribute the success of the United States to a handful of faces carved in a mountainside or etched onto currency?

America was built by the unknown for the worth-knowing. An unrecognized founding father named Button Gwinnett signed the Declaration of Independence so that Abraham Lincoln could one day sign the Emancipation Proclamation. The patriot laid to rest at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier sacrificed his life so that Rosa Parks could one day refuse to give up her bus seat. Slaves labored to construct the White House so that one day Michelle Bachmann and Hilary Clinton could have a shot at sitting in the Oval Office. The fingerprints of the unnamed masses lay beneath the thin layer of recognizable individuals and milestone accomplishments that highlight history textbooks.

No one will ever know the name of patriot who left his fingerprint on the Declaration of Independence. But just down the road from where that document rests is a memorial dedicated to the man who penned the words of the Declaration; every Fourth of July, fireworks illuminate his tribune, and people speak his name with respect and awe. To some, we build monuments, and to others, we give honor by imitating their courage and patriotism and by walking down the path of freedom they laid out before us. Immigrants. Descendants of the Pilgrims. Welfare families. Trust fund babies. Criminals. Religious ministers. Farmers. Wall Street brokers. Republicans. Democrats. Privileged women of color. Low-income white men. Single dads. CEO mothers. United by freedom and empowered by liberty, these are the ones who bring independence to life through the way they live their day to day lives as Americans.

All are equally American, and all have equal claim on the American Story. Whoever you are, whatever your narrative is, if you use the privilege of your liberty to make a way for others to find their own freedom, if you celebrate every day you wake up an American as Independence Day, you, too, will surely leave your fingerprints on America’s legacy.

Written by Savanna

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Remember

It was years in the making. For nearly a decade, the British Parliament and King George III had passed tax act after tax act on paper goods, legal documents, sugar, currency, and tea. The pleas from the oppressed American colonies fell on deaf ears, and everything was made worse by the Boston Massacre in 1770. Tensions ran high. The first Continental Congress met in 1774 to try and make peace with the king, issuing statements and letters to Parliament begging for an end of the relentless taxation. The correspondence was ignored. The king instead passed “The Intolerable Acts.” Soon, American colonists began calling themselves patriots. There were calls for armistice and calls for independence. The colonies were divided. Then the British troops marched on the towns of Lexington and Concord to capture the American militia’s rifle and powder supply. The Revolution had begun.

In the ensuing war, the American patriots displayed their very best qualities of tenacity, patriotism, and heroism. General Washington led his troops bravely into battle. John Adams fought for independence in a stubborn second Continental Congress. Thomas Jefferson labored over his writing table to produce a declaration to Britain. Militia couriers ran back and forth across enemy lines to deliver messages. Citizens tended to battle wounds and gathered supplies for the Continental Army.

Then came July 2, 1776. In a little room in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress declared their breaking off from Britain. Two days later, the Declaration of Independence was adopted.

Since then, every year on July 4, the United States of America celebrates Independence Day. Flags wave. Firecrackers go off. Parades rumble through the streets of American cities. Everywhere, there is a sense of pride and patriotism. It is a time to remember our nation’s history and the struggle that produced it. The Fourth of July is a time of immense pride, but it doesn’t have to be celebrated only on that day. We can remember the sacrifice of our American Founders every day. We have been born in the greatest country in history with the greatest freedoms on earth. We are allowed to choose our own destinies and paths in life, and, most importantly, we are allowed the freedom to worship the one true God without persecution or condemnation. This is the greatest freedom.

We are blessed here in the United States. We are free. God’s hand is on our nation, and we should be thankful. As we celebrate our nation’s birthday, remember the history of America. Remember the men and women who fought for freedom to create a nation based on God’s principles. Whenever you see an American flag, remember.

Written by Jenna

Image credit: http://hhill.wonecks.net/files/2016/01/americanflag-1qe9980.jpg