Silly Love Songs

“Some people want to fill the world with silly love songs. And what’s wrong with that? I’d like to know” (McCartney, verse 1). Valentine’s Day is my favorite holiday. It represents something beautiful: love. Love seems difficult to define and to obtain. Sometimes it acts like an emotion, while other times it’s a choice or even a fated destiny. Love can even take different forms linguistically, being defined as either a verb or a noun. Personally, I think that love can have different meanings to different people at different times. In fact, one of the attributes of love I am fondest of is this sort of graceful, catch-all nature it seems to have.

Valentine’s Day has come to be known especially for its representation of romantic love. I’ve always thought that a romantic kind of love was magical. Once upon a time, I was a little girl swooning over Disney princesses as they danced with their princes. Now, I’m an adult with a heart that bursts with excitement as I watch the people around me fall in love, get married, have children, and grow in love day by day. I definitely want to get married someday. I think of marriage as a friendship you’ll never lose and a chosen partnership for life. You choose a person and that person chooses you. Comedian Ray Romano described his own marriage this way: “You wake up—she’s there. You come back from work—she’s there. You fall asleep—she’s there. You eat dinner—she’s there. You know? I mean, I know that sounds like a bad thing. But it’s not” (Raymond, episode 9).

real-heart-hands

Love can also take a much simpler form than a lifelong partnership with a husband or wife. Love can be found in a single act taken by one person on behalf of another. For an example, the week or so surrounding finals last semester was a rough time for me. During my Sunday morning church service that week, I was all but exhausted mentally and physically. An older married couple who are members of my church came to see me after the service to tell me that I’d been on their minds lately and ask if there was any way they could pray with me. Their coming to me and asking to pray communicated so much love to me in that moment; it was exactly what I needed, and it reminded me of God’s everlasting love for me.

Sometimes love is in the thought that one person expends for another. It really can be the thought that counts when it comes to love. In recent years, my siblings and I have begun exchanging little Christmas gifts. It’s my idea because I like buying ridiculous things for my brother and sister. My sister outdid me last year, though, when it came to thoughtfulness. She told me a week before Christmas that she’d picked out my gift and that it was not what I’d asked for. Naturally, I was worried and even a little annoyed. After all, my sister likes to think things through her own convoluted mental processes. She has even told me on several occasions that she cannot predict what I’ll say, do, or want in any given circumstance. On Christmas Day, she presented me with a radio adaptor that would let me play music from my phone through my car’s radio. She remembered that I didn’t have an auxiliary plug in my car and that my grandmother had gotten a Wow Hits 2007 CD stuck in the player years before she gave it to me. She took the time to think about what I really wanted and gave me a stellar gift I still use to this day. When I opened it and realized what she’d done, I felt remembered, considered, and loved.

Love is multi-faceted, easily felt, and always better in excess than in lack. Valentine’s Day gives me an extra reason to celebrate the love of all the wonderful people around me. Love, in all its forms and with all its facets, is a trait to be cherished. It is more than silly love songs; it is the very core of Jesus Himself.

Written by Becca

McCartney, Paul. “Silly Love Songs.” Wings at the Speed of Sound, Capitol, 1976. “The Lone Barone.”

Everybody Loves Raymond, created by Philip Rosenthal, performance by Ray Romano, season 3, episode 9, 1998.

Image credits: Header image, Heart-shaped Hands

Music to My Ears

Music and writing are nearly synonymous to me. When I am writing just about anything, be it for school or for fun, there is usually music flooding through my headphones or the speaker on my phone. It doesn’t particularly matter what kind of music it is; it can be my favorite rock group or an instrumental piece of video game music (yes, I am a nerd), but the right music sometimes helps me set the mood for a scene or find more creative ways to phrase something.

When a person writes a song, he or she is stringing abstract sounds together into something coherent and meaningful; when a person writes a story or paper, he or she is doing the exact same thing. In this sense, technically, anyone can write either a poem or a ballad.

However, it is only when the heart and soul get involved that something truly magical takes place. It can be difficult to pinpoint exactly what changes, but what would ordinarily exist without purpose suddenly becomes full of life. This is something that both English and music professionals can testify to. Musicians regularly spend months recording, planning, and tweaking their songs before releasing an album, and authors of novels might spend months, perhaps years, on a rough draft alone. Their creative work quickly consumes their lives, and a part of their being can be said to permeate the finished product.

Most people, teenagers and adults alike, know what it’s like to become immersed in a song or to sing the lyrics at the top of their lungs in the car or shower. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could experience such passion in our own writing, even if it’s just for a class paper? After all, if we are trying to accomplish the same goal as a musician, shouldn’t we feel the same way they do? And shouldn’t we see a notable, positive change in our writing?

Yes! Heart and soul are essential to a good paper. Professors notice when you care, and, knowing that, you may find yourself hating a blank word document a little bit less.

How can you add some personality to your paper? The best thing you can do is write about the things you love. If you’ve followed the Dallas Cowboys since you were small, but you try to write about the Philadelphia Eagles, whatever distaste you harbor for the Eagles will most likely evidence itself, especially if your professor was born and raised in Pennsylvania. The same is true for any topic you choose; if you love your subject, your writing experience will improve.

Now, I’m not saying you should write about something completely unrelated to the general subject matter just because you love it; your religion professor, for example, likely has no interest in reading a paper about the Dallas Cowboys. However, the ability to take a professor’s prompt and stretch it to its furthest boundaries shows your ability to think critically and, therefore, helps increase the credibility of your words.

Don’t be afraid to think outside the box, for a paper you love will almost certainly be music to your professor’s ears.

Written by Catherine