Letter to the Unsure Writer

Dear Unsure Writer,

We’ve all been there: the place where we’ve written a paper and turned it in, and we’re afraid of the possibility of a failing grade. We’ve all produced papers that we feel are not up to par with the grades we want on them. But take heart! We don’t always have to feel like what we’ve done isn’t good enough. There are a few ways to check and make sure that the work we’re about to turn in is exactly what we want it to be.

The first and easiest way is to simply read the paper out loud, especially from the first to the last paragraph. Take 10-15 minutes to sit down with the paper and go through it. People often find that by reading their work out loud, confusing phrases and typos are brought to light and can be easily fixed. The ear is the best tool to check for mistakes after slaving over a paper for who-knows-how-long, but remember to spend some time away from the work before reading it to give the brain a break.

Get a friend or two to read it. Not only can they catch typing and phrasing aberrations, they can tell if the ideas present in the paper go along with what the writer wants to say. This prevents rabbit trails and ensures every point refers back to the thesis. Plus, it isn’t the author tiredly rereading the same material without actually noticing anything wrong. Most of the time, minor errors that were previously over looked could add up to a large percentage of points counted off by the professor.

Ask the professor if s/he will take a rough draft and give comments/corrections. The professor is the one grading the final product, so s/he knows what is desired when the work is turned in. This is a great way to understand which direction to go on a paper and ensure that the all the guidelines set by the professor are met. S/he can give helpful advice either on the paper or what to do if s/he will not look at a rough draft.

Finally, the option that will give authors the most help possible: visit the University Writing Center (UWC). At the Center, a trained consultant is able to sit down with authors and walk through their papers in a friendly, helpful way. The consultants at the UWC are well trained in the most up-to-date practices and rules of grammar and writing needs. They are paid to walk alongside students with their works, so why not set up an appointment to go through a paper? Their job is to help all writers become more confident in their skills and to make sure those writers understand what mistakes they make on a regular basis so they can be fixed. A consultation may bring to light some obscure meanings or flow issues that had not been detected by the author’s ear or friends.

After working hard on a paper, it is a wise decision to get all the help available in order to be confident about the product being turned in. There is no need to be unsure about the work produced when so many options are available to help improve it.

So the next time a paper is due, don’t feel uncomfortable about the work being submitted. Take advantage of the many choices available, especially the UWC, in order to be confident with the final product.

Written by Maddison

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Letter to the Overwhelmed Writer

Dear Overwhelmed Writer,

First of all, you are not alone. Even the most experienced writers can get bogged down in ideas, sources, and deadlines. I have learned from experience that writing assignments can definitely be stressful. Sometimes the page count is just too daunting, or the right words are hard to find. However, I have some good news: no matter what it is you’re struggling with, it can be overcome.

For starters, a good way to cut down on the stress of writing assignments, no matter what kind, is to go into the writing process with everything already prepared. If the writing process is for a paper, gather all of the sources, quotes, and information ahead of time and have them readily accessible. If you’re writing a story, write out the main idea and make sure that it makes sense and that all the important details are accounted for. Next, outline. Every piece of writing should start as an outline. Any easy way is to go scene by scene or paragraph by paragraph and write down the ideas and information you want to use in that section. The easiest way is to also include any quotes or statistics with their sources in the outline, to avoid having to hunt them down later. Then, when the writing process starts, it’s just a matter of converting the ideas into words. However, the key is to do all of the preparation ahead of time instead of the night before. Researching and outlining can sometimes be a long process, and an impending deadline can cut the writing time short.

Although the worst is now over, writing itself can sometimes cause anxiety. There are many times where the right words just aren’t coming to mind. For situations like this, a thesaurus will be your best friend. It helps a lot to be able to look up similar words that will often lead to a better synonym. Another tip that often helps with writing is waiting until after the work is completely done to do any editing. Getting caught up in going back and making changes slows down the process and sometimes the entire work needs to be complete to be able to tell if an idea makes sense or not. If necessary, cover the entire screen except for the line or two you are currently working on. Then, once it’s finished, go back and check for spelling, grammar, and fluency. Also, don’t be afraid to ask for help if it feels like things aren’t going well. The Writing Center can be a great resource, and having a second set of eyes can help.

There you go: some tips to get you through the stress of the writing process. Now that you know how to beat the overwhelming feeling, you have all the power in the world. Next time you feel the anxiety setting in, start early and be prepared; you’ve got this in the bag. So, go forth and write!

Written by Taylor

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Letter to the Student-Athlete Writer

Dear Student-Athlete Writer,

First of all, you have my sincerest apologies. I’m sorry that Hollywood and the media have given the name “Student-Athlete Writer” an unfortunate, negative stigma. For some reason, along with countless other offensive and inaccurate archetypes, popular culture has crafted and exploited the false stereotype of the dumb jock. It’s unfair, it’s stupid, and we wish it didn’t exist.

Second, and more importantly though, you have our highest respect. The team here in the Writing Center does not view student-athlete writers in any negative light. You awe and inspire us, and if we’re being frank, most of us wish we had an inch of the talent God has blessed you with. We know that you work harder than many of your peers, are just as academically capable as your peers, and are going to achieve great things both now and in the future.

Refuse to believe the lie that you are not skilled enough, prepared enough, or designed well-enough by your Creator to hurdle the obstacles that stand between where you are today and the distinguished accomplishment of graduating as an athlete and a scholar. Sometimes the lies come from well-meaning loved ones, sometimes they come from ignorant strangers on the internet, and sometimes they come from your own mind. Wherever they come from, throw them out now.

Missing class to travel for games is tough, but it doesn’t mean that you cannot be fully prepared to write your papers. The consultants in the Writing Center are available to help you at every stage of your writing process. An assignment instruction sheet and a willing attitude are all that is required for us to begin helping you, and if you’re willing, we will stick with you through the rough draft, the revision process, and the final formatting. If you have access to Wi-Fi while traveling with the team, we can even help you via Blackboard’s Collaborate. We never correct papers because we view our services as a way to help students learn how to become better writers. Our goal in every session is to help you improve your current paper and future papers by equipping you as a writer.

Writing mechanics are not easy; thesis statements, academic language, and proper citations can be intimidating prospects for anyone, but you are better skilled for the task than you may imagine. The playbook you have memorized in your head is infinitely more complicated than the formatting packets we can walk you through step by step. While the rules for academic writing may be tedious and unconventional, they pale in comparison to the complexity of the penalties, scoring techniques, and winning strategies of your sport. Thesis statements are difficult to compose, but they are no more difficult than breaking a full-court press, snagging a game-winning out, or coming back from a love-40 deficit.

Most importantly, you have the capability to be a successful college writer because your brain is hardwired for success. As a student-athlete writer, you have the advantages of discipline, longevity, and perseverance to help you tackle your writing endeavors. Athletes do not see difficulties that result in defeat; they see challenges that develop champions. It takes incredible mental strength to push through two-a-day practices, and the analytical power it takes for a batter to calculate the speed of a fastball or for a goalie to predict the trajectory of a goal attempt is beyond most people’s comprehension. Only a special kind of person is willing to test the mental and physical limits of his or her body under the scrutinizing eyes of the public, knowing his or her performance will either be a delight or a disappointment.

If you can do that, dare we say you can do anything?

Please don’t hesitate to visit our office or call and schedule an appointment. We want to see you go above and beyond your personal academic expectations and become the proficient, effective writer that you hold the potential to be. Like a knowledgeable coach, an encouraging teammate, and supportive parent all wrapped up into one, the Writing Center wants to be there to assist you every step of the way.

-The Writing Center

PS: One of our director’s favorite former consultants was a student-athlete writer. We don’t just love student-athlete writers who visit; we love the ones who work for us, too!

Written by Savanna

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The Pen Dripped Red

To celebrate our recent 100th blog post, the UWC decided we’d look at the most popular blogs from each of our authors.

Mine… was from a year and a half ago.

My boss, who was just asking out of curiosity, inquired what the thesis of my blog post was. With some trepidation, I looked at the document and tried to remind myself what the heck I’d said. My memory was (and is) terrible. And, apparently, my grammar back then was just as equally despicable. I projected my despair to the general populace. How could I possibly reintroduce such a rough blog to the web? I wanted to either fix or re-write the entire thing. My wonderful supervisor thought showing the process of revision was a wonderful idea, and this was born. Behold, the markup of an author revising his own work! Enjoy its glorious, red-filled pages and the extent to which I tear my own words apart as they flee in terror.

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Presented by Isaac

Image credits: Header image, Evil Laughter Cat

Letter to the International Student Writer

To the international student writer,

I love it when you come to the UWC. Don’t tell your peers, but international students are among my favorites to work with. You are bright, eager, and hard-working. I can’t imagine what it would be like to move to a different continent, across the world for some of you, or to navigate a foreign school system. All too often, you enter our Writing Center appearing solemn, fearful, or sad. I want you to know that not only are you always welcome no matter how ardently you may be struggling with an assignment, but it is a joy to work with you. For me, few things feel more rewarding than when that understanding glimmer appears in your eyes, and you are able to apply a new writing concept to your ever-expanding set of skills. Surviving as a college student is no simple task; you, on the other hand, face more challenges than most. The barriers of language, social standards, and course-work expectations test you daily. Although most of us at the Writing Center can’t fully understand the struggles you endure, we are trained to support and equip you. Some of you don’t realize that your writing struggles are universal. We see students of all ages, backgrounds, and ethnicities, and all of them have writing weaknesses. In many ways, you have come farther than most traditional students. Few of us are fluent in more than one language, and writing coherently in a different tongue is a separate challenge of its own. Take pride in your progress, no matter how marginal it may seem to you.

Did you know that international students often grasp grammar concepts better than traditional students? Lots of college students were not thoroughly trained in crucial concepts of grammar, structure, and the like. You, on the other hand, had to familiarize yourself with a plethora of writing rules in order to get where you are today. This is an advantage that many of your peers would benefit from. Even when there is something you don’t understand or simply haven’t been taught, you are well equipped to learn.

At the UWC, ‘discouragement’ is not in our vocabulary. Our writing consultants are equippers, not maligners. Although writing apprehension is certainly not particular to you, it shouldn’t ever stop you, either. International students, come to the UWC. Your faces are always a welcome sight, and we are here to help you grow.

Sincerely,

Consultant Karoline

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Thank You

Graduation. One day, it’s four years away, and the next, it hits you like a brick wall to the face. For me, the closer I crept toward graduation, the further away it felt. It was elusive, that coveted cap and gown. It was the end goal. But as my days at DBU come to a close, I realize that a degree is only half of it. The diploma, the tassel, the walk across the stage. All those things can never compare to the four years I spent making late-night food runs with friends, pulling all-nighters to study for exams, getting to know my wonderful professors, joining a sorority to be a part of a sisterhood, breathlessly trekking up the massive hills on campus to get to class, watching friends figure out their exciting futures right alongside me, and working at the Writing Center with my extraordinary coworkers to help students become better writers.

All college students experience many of these wonderful things, but I’m fairly certain not many can claim “best job ever” on their W-4 forms (wait, you can’t do that?). My two years, three months, and one day at the Writing Center have been unimaginably exceptional. Working at the Writing Center has not been merely a job. It has been a privilege and an incredible experience.

It’s hard not to look back on my years at DBU with wistful nostalgia. Just a mere four years has managed to transform me from the naive young girl I was in high school into the (slightly) more confident woman I am today. Four years has managed to change my perspective about many things, and four years has allowed me to forge unbreakable friendships and make unforgettable experiences.

They say you don’t know how good you have it until it’s gone. I can now say that’s true. As my days left at DBU dwindle, I realize how truly good I had it. I had friendships, experiences, and responsibilities, and I wouldn’t trade any of them, good or bad.

I’m going to miss walking up the monstrous hills to the LC (well, only a little bit). I’m going to miss seeing familiar faces as we all enter the chapel at 10am. I’m going to miss the bustle of midweek when the line to Chick-fil-a is out the door. I’m going to miss seeing the smiles of my Writing Center family as I walk in to start my shift. I’ve built up my life here at DBU, and it’s going to be hard to leave that life. But DBU—and the Writing Center—is a foundation to bigger things. DBU is a part of who I’ve become, a part of who I will be, and it’s time to take that new foundation into the future. It’s time to take what I’ve learned from my classes, my sorority, my friends, my organizations, and the Writing Center and take it into a future, albeit uncertain, beyond DBU Hill. Even in the midst of nostalgia and wistful reminiscences, I look forward to the things that are yet to come. So thank you, DBU. And thank you, Writing Center.

Written by Jenna, Graduate of Dallas Baptist University, May 2016

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Mending Failing Friendships

To put things plainly, friendships are hard. While friendships with little difference of opinion can be fruitful, those with many differences are incredible character builders. At times, it may feel like a friendship isn’t worth your time and only brings stress, but through communication, patience, and putting pride to the side, a friendship can turn a corner and prove to be worth the effort.

It is important to have people to turn to in times of trial, but when the people chosen to be a source of comfort turn into a source of hostility, ending the friendship seems to be the logical thing to do. However, cutting all ties with people we are friends with can be more detrimental than staying in that toxic relationship and trying to resolve things.

Recently, the girls in my friend group, myself included, have been experiencing a strain in our friendship. I will not mention names or events that have occurred, but I will say it has led to avoidance, awkwardness, anger, sadness, and bitterness.

One of the girls and I decided to talk to our RA about the things we have been dealing with and discuss whether or not we should discontinue being friends with the other girls or not. She encouraged us through a quote: “Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, and small minds discuss people.” She said to talk about ideas or ways to resolve the situation instead of talking about the other girls. Talking about what the girls did wrong is merely gossip. It only spurs on the harboring of bitterness. We decided the best way to smooth everything out is to have an open conversation with our RA as a mediator.

There are many obligations demanding our attention: busy schedules, academics, work, volunteer responsibilities, etc., so it can be hard to find time to put aside for spending quality time with friends. Yet, quality time is so important in keeping the lines of communication open. It is important to recognize that sometimes the problem in a relationship can be personal pride. When trying to decide if a friendship is worth the time to fix, we have to not only look at what the other person has done to make us feel a certain way but also discern how we got to that point in the first place.

As a Christian, I am called to love. In the Bible, 1 John 4:20 states, “Whoever claims to love God yet hates a brother or sister is a liar. For whoever does not love their brother and sister, whom they have seen, cannot love God, whom they have not seen.” If I don’t show at least some effort in understanding how the other person in the relationship feels, then I am being prideful, and for me, pride leads to anger. I struggle with anger. And, when I feel neglected by people, I shut them out and push the idea of repairing the friendship to the side. However, when I do this, it just causes me pain because I lost what could have been a valuable friendship.

Not trying to repair a broken friendship and, instead, removing a person from our lives causes us to have unresolved problems in our past friendships that haunt us and affect us negatively on an unconscious level. Fixing a friendship is usually worth the time and effort. Communication and expressing yourself are essential in cultivating a great relationship, and human relationships are really the foundation of our civilization and a true source of happiness.

Written by Cheyanne

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